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!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a federal appeals court has ruled u.s. corporations can no longer be sued for human rights violations abroad under the longstanding alien tort statute. and a little notice drilling thisonth, the second u.s. court of appeals ruled that alien tort claims can only be brought against individuals, not corporations. the ruling dismissed a lawsuit accusing the oil giant royal dutch shell of complicity in the murder and torture of nigerian activists including ken saro- wiwa. in a separate opinion, second circuit judge criticized the ruling writing -- a federal appeals court has issued a temporary order reinstating government funding for embryonic stem cell research. on tuesday, the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia circuit issued a stay of a lower court injunction that blocked the obama administration's reversal of bush-era restrictions on stem cell funding. the lower court had ruled the funding violates a 1996 law prohibiting federal money for any research that destroys or threatens human embryos. the funding wi
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
't afford the internet. you have free internet. you can teach them how to use the internet for educational purposes. >> they have wonderful videos. >> they've got dvds, they've got video, all kinds of educational trips. want to go to italy? rent the video for a whole week. it's actually a very wonderful resource. >> ask a young child in india what they want to be, they say a software engineer. ask the kids in america, they want to be a star. >> don't forget to tune in at 1:00 p.m. and tomorrow at 3k to all a ali velshi. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> people on this saturday morning waking up to severe west. the governors in minnesota and wisconsin declaring states of emergency. >>> plus 38 days from midterm elections and 38 days and two years from the 2012 presidential election. we're going to tell you who's headed there today. from the cnn center, this is "cnn saturday morning." good morning to you all. i'm joe griffin in for t.j. this morning. thanks for starting your day with us. >>> also coming up in the next 90 minutes, these stories. the fbi raiding many groups in the midw
for us. thanks for joining us. we'll see you tomorrow bright and early. be there. with bells on. the news continues on cnn with kyra phillips. >> good morning. here is what we're working on this morning for you. >> down. stay down. heads down. stay down. >> cell phone cameras catch the fear during an emergency landing. how a pilot saved the day for 64 people. tackling arizona politics, protester confronts senator john mccain and ends up on the ground. you'll see the entire video. and if you're digging into breakfast is your cereal organic? we're looking at the difference in price, taste and health benefits as we kick off a week and a long focus on food. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast, 6:00 a.m. out west. you're live in the cnn newsroom. >>> the leader of one of the nation's most influential black mega choyfrps says he is ready to fight against allegations that he pray preyed on four young men to force them into sexual relationships. eddy long stood at the pulpit defending himself at georgia's new birth missionary baptist church. >> as i said earlier, i am not a perfect man. but this thing i'
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
to a 2018? will the republicans take control of the chamber? she reminds us of the history. that year the republicans swept the house races. the republican majority and republican speaker, newt gingrich -- she writes that speaker nancy pelosi is a famously in no danger. it probably means something that she appears to have gone missing from the national scene. cbs had her at 11% approval rating among registered voters in march. republicans were beating democrats might tend points 54% to 24%. in the history of that poll, the gop has never led by more than five points. what do you think? is this 1994 again? will the republicans be able to surge ahead and take control of the house? the stock about governors' races. can they take strides there? what is that need to president obama and his time in office? she went to a conservative activist to give his taken things. he was a contributor to the "contract to america." he was the founder of "americans for tax reform." he was one of the most insightful political reserves -- observers. he noted that republicans in 1994 were not pulling as well t
for granted on a daily basis to live in freedom, to live in democracy. those are the ones who allow us to do. that today we have the opportunity to help make our soldiers and our veterans, to help transition them into civilian life much easier. h.r. 5282 will help to make opportunities available to the brave men and women who are returning from the fight on the global war on terror and this legislation will continue our commitment to our veterans through education and employment opportunities. and as part of the civil works mission, the corps of engineers, they uncover countless historic artifacts continuously. a lot of these artifacts, which are very important items, are frankly just uncatalogged and are just kind of almost semiabandoned and they need curation. so, this is such a commonsense bill. it helps preserve our history, preserve our past, while also making sure that we give opportunities to the most noble, to the best and the brightest of our country, to our troops and to our veterans. i urge all members to support our receipt advance and support this -- our veterans and support thi
weather center tracking all of this for us this morning. so are they still in a situation where the waters are still rising now? >> no, the river at least at portage did crest last night. but it's going to remain above flood stage for quite some time. not only across wisconsin, but southern and central parts of minnesota. we've got all these rivers that are actually draining into the mississippi. and we're going to see some issues, i think, downstream from there, as well. so that's issue number one. issue number two is -- more immediate concerns, what's going on in portage. here's where the river crested. the record is is 20.5 feet. it crested just above that last night. and now it's at about 20.2 feet. we're at near record strange. major flood stage, but not expected to come back down below flood stage really until late wednesday into thursday. so we've got quite some time before this river really gets below the danger zone. and what i mean by danger zone is, well, usually after a river crests, we can relax, but because of this situation where you have all of that pressure on this very, v
about jimmy carter that seems to emerge every few years that explain to us why he was beaten so soundly in 1980? >> well, he feels, i think it's safe to say, unappreciat unappreciated -- not underappreciated, unappreciated. as we all know, you don't get to be president by having a deficit of grandosty. right, that's not a qualification for the job. all of these guys have that to some degree or another. some hide it better than others. i think as president carter gets older, he hides it not at all. >> so you're saying, not as as well as others? >> not at all. >> let's put the whole story aut there, for what it's worth. by the way, in washington this morning -- >> begins in plains. >> we have with us, a proposal historian, michael. he said, basically, after these comments aired yesterday, because, you know, president carter is on a media blitz for his book, "white house diary." he says this, what i meant was for 27 years, any carter center has provided me with superior opportunities to do good. >> if we can just say, that is the worst clarification -- >> i'm not going to defend that argum
. natalie morales will join us for a live report. >>> what's it like to be a member of a polygamist family? one man and his four wives are here in the studio to talk about it in a live interview. >> let us begin with a check of the top stories. >> thank you so much. good morning. >>> in the news this morning, president obama challenging world leaders to support a peace deal and if they do, he says, it may lead to a new member of the u.n. an independent state of palestine living in peace with israel by this time next year. on wednesday the president said the u.s. will continue to help developing countries but instead of buying short-term solutions, he said, the focus will be more on diplomacy and investment to help nations prosper. >>> nato confirms the taliban commander has been captured in southern afghanistan. the commander helped supply militants in the area with money for weapons. >>> in iowa egg producer testified before congress on wednesday apologized for salmonella outbreak that sickened 1600 people and led to a massive egg recall. a second egg producer took the fifth amendment. >>
and afghanistan. thanks for starting your day with us. >>> also coming up over the next 90 minutes, protecting state secrets or going too far. the defense department buys and then destroys thousands of copies of this book, written by an army reserve officer. a book disclosing secret operations in afghanistan. a department spokesman says the book titled "operation dark heart" contained information that could damage national security. the author, a lieutenant colonel, said the action, quoting here, smacks of retaliation. >>> believe it or not, this bird, that one there, it's under arrest. police in one notorious drug trading city in colombia said the parrot was trained by his owners, suspected drug dealers torbgs alert them when the police showed up. we'll have the details for you in the morning passport. >>> plus profiting on youtube. you may not know their names, but you know their videos. now their online videos are earning them a pretty good living. >>> let's get right to the controversy over a leading baptist minister. bishop eddie long of the new birth missionary baptist church is expected
will join us. andrew ross sorkin, and eugene robinson, all coming up today on "morning joe." good lineup. >> we've got a very good lineup and a lot to get to. >> we'll start with the news. with the midterm elections fast approaching, president obama rolling out new finishives to boost the economy. and tomorrow in cleveland, the president will reportedly propose a permanent extension of tax credits for business owners to invest in research and development. also on the table a plan to allow companies to write off 100% of their investments in new plants and equipment through the end of next year. yesterday in milwaukee, the president announced a proposal to invest in new roads and railways. the $50 initiative is a six-year plan that would create a government-run bank to finance transportation projects. the white house says it would create jobs by improving and expanding $150,000 miles of the nation's roads, 4,000 miles of railways, and 150 miles of airport runways. although president obama says the plan will be fully paid for, and will not add to the deficit, republican leaders like john bo
that actually changed the practice in santa clara. i want to start with amy and if you can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it w
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
, pointing out that panther jackson lived at the apartment building whose lower level was being used as the polling place. this reason was later abandoned by the division, but the fact that it was inserted shortly after the dismissal of the case strongly suggests it was inserted closed sometime during the dismissal. even if it was true that panther jackson resided there, and should be quite clear to all that such a fact would not have provided a legal basis for intimidating voters. to understand the rationale of these reasons for guiding this panther case, one only has to state the facts in the racial reversed. assume two members of the coup clocks klan, one of which lived in an apartment building that was used at the polling place, showed up at the entrance in kkk clothes. assume that they were yelling racial slurs at black voters who were in minority of the people registered to vote at that particular polling place, and the klansmen were blocking the polling place. assume that a local policeman came on the scene and it determined that the coup clocks klan must leave, the one with t
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)